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The keftedakia ($9.50) at Glenview’s Plateia Mediterranean Kitchen are beef meatballs with mint, served with pita and tzatziki sauce. Jason Addy/22nd Century Media
Pho Nam Bac’s rice noodle bowl is filled with rice noodles, bean sprouts, lettuce, cucumber and mint, all covered in a marinade and optional hot sauces. Erin Yarnall/22nd Century Media
A 12-ounce size of the new Peppermint Hot Chocolate at Glencoe’s Hometown Coffee & Juice is priced at $4.25. Alex Ivanisevic/22nd Century Media
True Juice is offering a peppermint smoothie ($7.95) during the holiday season in Winnetka and Highland Park. Megan Bernard/22nd Century Media
True Juice is offering a peppermint smoothie ($7.95) during the holiday season in Winnetka and Highland Park. Megan Bernard/22nd Century Media
The Neiman Marcus Cafe’s citrus salad ($18) features mixed greens, shaved fennel, grapefruit, avocado, mint, goat cheese, toasted almonds and is topped with a pomegranate vinaigrette dressing. Martin Carlino/22nd Century Media
Staff report
3:00 am CST December 24, 2019

Legend has it that mint, and more specifically, peppermint, first became associated with the Christmas holiday in 1670.

According to our sources, and an exhaustive Google search, a choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, handed the candy out to children at their living Nativity, to keep the kids occupied. The candy was shaped to look like a shepherd’s staff. The peppermint flavor probably wasn’t introduced for another 200 years. They became popular to hang on Christmas trees in the United States.